7 Blogs for UX Designers. Find Out What You Are Missing

7 Blogs for UX Designers. Find Out What You Are Missing

Let’s talk about UX once again

Have you ever gone to a website in search of some information, but couldn’t find your way around and lost your interest in the content almost immediately? Beautiful visual design with compelling images, animations and videos don’t guarantee the success of your app anymore. Users need a better understanding of the content they are searching for. And here comes UX design, which specialises in designing products that are applicable, easy to use, and delightful to interact with.

Since the concept of UX appeared in the 1990s, the field has evolved greatly giving the world many experts in improving user experience and making our interaction with technology as intuitive and natural as it can possibly be. Fortunately, the gurus of UX such as Andy Budd, Liz Danzico, Aaron Walter, Stu Collett, to name a few, eagerly share their knowledge, and we can benefit exploring their blogs on IU and UX design. So for your convenience, we’ve made an overview of the top 11 most effective and interesting blogs covering this heated topic.

#1 Boxes and Arrows

Boxes and Arrows is a large blog with lots of UX articles which provide an entire platform on design, experience, interaction, research, and testing. Such outstanding designers as Aaron T. Travis, Abby Covert, Adam Polansky, Alejo Jumat gained their popularity while performing on Boxes and Arrows. Although the blog is quite informative, an avid reader might get a bit starved for content as the updates on this blog are made only once a month.

#2 A List Apart

This blog has been around since 1997 and it was created “For people who make websites”. A List Apart is reported to be in the first five of most widely used blogs among web designers with 140 thousand followers on Twitter and 37 thousand on Facebook. It’s worth mentioning that the greatest attention on this blog is paid to the meaning of web content with a special focus on web standards. As a newbie in web design, I recommend this blog to everyone who wants to work in this sphere.

#3 UX Booth

Another highly informative blog, which is especially good for beginners and intermediate UX designers. Matthew Kammerer, the founder of UX Booth, together with Marli Mesibov (managing editor), Kristina Bjoran (contributing editor) and John Philips (developer) work passionately in the field, creating solutions to UX challenges. 73 thousand readers following UX Booth on Twitter have the chance to get acquainted with 3-5 new posts a week.

#4 UX Myths

UX Myths covers the most frequent user experience misapprehensions and clarifies why they aren’t true. Frankly speaking, the blog is extremely interesting as it includes facts, quotes, and articles of well-known designers whose main purpose is to denounce the widespread web design misconceptions, such as:

  • UX is about usability;
  • people can tell you what they want;
  • users make optimal choices;
  • people read on the web, etc.

The list is definitely worth studying further if you’re genuinely interested in UX.

#5 Digital Telepathy

This bright video blog has been around since 2009. Dan Trenkner, art designer of the blog says: “Every day I’m blown away by the talent here. Our designers and developers are constantly pushing the limits of what’s possible.” Despite uncompromising creativity which you’ll definitely find on Digital Telepathy, the blog lacks informative articles based on UX and concentrates most of the attention on UI.

#6 Nielsen Norman Group

Nielsen Norman Group was established by famous design authorities Jakob Nielsen and Don Norman in 1998. The goal of NN/g is to carry out qualitative user experience research and give a set of interface design references based on tested arguments. Training, consulting and research is the three main topics running through the blog. Also, they’ve recently conducted UX conferences in Chicago and Singapore.

#7 Useful Usability

This one is truly lively and diverse. Here you can find 360 exciting videos from 54 UX and design conferences around the world. Moreover, there are 35 article categories, so you won’t have any problems finding what you need at once.

All things considered, there are lots of UX blogs on the web and it’s your choice which one to use and follow, but we hope that this review will help you to have a bigger picture and figure out what is best for you.

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